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About us

We are the one place to contact if you have a complaint or notification about a health service provided in Queensland.

The Office of the Health Ombudsman exists to protect the health and safety of the people of Queensland.


Who we are

The Office of the Health Ombudsman (OHO) is the one place to contact if you have a complaint or notification to make about a health service provided in Queensland.

The OHO is an independent body established under the Health Ombudsman Act 2013 (the Act).

The Health Ombudsman, Andrew Brown, leads the office of about 140 staff, most of whom work directly on complaints resolution.

Andrew has more than 25 years’ experience in the public sector, primarily in the areas of legal services, regulatory oversight and complaints management. Andrew has extensive experience in public administration and designing and implementing effective and efficient regulatory and complaints management processes. Previously, Andrew was employed as the Deputy Ombudsman at the Queensland Ombudsman’s Office. He has also worked at Queensland Corrective Services in numerous roles including the Chief Inspector of Prisons.

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What we do

Our main objectives are to:

  • protect the health and safety of the public
  • promote professional, safe and competent practice by health practitioners
  • promote high standards of service delivery by health service organisations
  • maintain public confidence in the management of complaints and other matters relating to the provision of health services.

To do this, we:

  • receive and manage health service complaints
  • decide what action to take in relation to those complaints and, in certain instances, take immediate action to protect the safety of the public
  • monitor the health, conduct and performance functions of the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (Ahpra) and 15 health practitioner National Boards
  • provide information about minimising and resolving health service complaints
  • report on our performance and on Queensland’s health service complaints statistics
  • protect public safety and safety
  • promote fair and transparent health service complaints management
  • work with Ahpra to regulate registered health practitioners in Queensland.

For more information on what we do, see What happens when you make a complaint.

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Working with Ahpra

The Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (Ahpra) is a national agency with offices in each state and territory. Ahpra manages the registration and accreditation of all registered health practitioners in Australia.

The types of health service currently covered by registration under Ahpra are:

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Practice
  • Chinese Medicine
  • Chiropractic
  • Dental
  • Medical
  • Medical Radiation Practice
  • Nursing and Midwifery
  • Occupational Therapy
  • Optometry
  • Osteopathy
  • Paramedicine
  • Pharmacy
  • Physiotherapy
  • Podiatry
  • Psychology.

In Queensland, the OHO and Ahpra work together to oversee and regulate registered health practitioners in relation to matters concerning their health, conduct and performance. The OHO and Ahpra work together under the Health Practitioner Regulation National Law (Queensland) 2009 (the National Law).

The OHO is the first place to contact for all health service complaints in Queensland. This includes notifications about registered practitioners. OHO receives these complaints and may refer the matters to Ahpra and the 15 health practitioner National Boards.

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Governance and oversight

The Health Ombudsman has powers under the Health Ombudsman Act 2013 (the Act).

Under the Act, the Minister for Health oversees the administration of the health service complaints management system and the performance of the Health Ombudsman, as well as the performance of Ahpra and the National Boards in relation to registered health practitioners in Queensland. The Minister keeps the Queensland Parliament and the community informed of these matters.

The Act provides for statutory oversight over the OHO’s operations by parliamentary committee. The Health Ombudsman meets with the parliamentary committee at regular intervals throughout the year.

Certain decisions taken by the Health Ombudsman can also be reviewed by the Queensland Civil and Administrative Tribunal.


Corporate information

For more information about the work we do, read our strategic plan.

We publish performance data and complaint statistics every month, in addition to our annual reports.

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